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First Comes Marriage, Then a Queen in a Baby Carriage?

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It’s a little early to be talking baby carriages for Prince William and Kate Middleton, but I remember when I first became engaged it didn’t take long for people to ask, “So are you going to have children?”


And then after you become pregnant, the question then becomes, “Is it a boy or a girl?”


And while your nosy Aunt Petunia is only asking so that she can give you her long list of baby names, the royal family may have different motivations altogether.


No my son isn’t a royal (in case you were wondering), so questions of succession don’t apply to us and our humble empire of Nissans and Nikes—but according to an article posted by Yahoo!, it seems that if Kate has a little girl first, she won’t be crowned queen—and therefore isn’t considered an heir to the throne.


The article states that “ … rules specifying who inherits the throne, now based on the 1701 Act of Settlement, are not easy to change.” But with Kate and William’s nuptials on the horizon, lawmakers think the political environment may be ripe for a change in the three-hundred-year-old policy.


And while the royal wedding set for April 29 is bound to modernize certain aspects of Britain—as Kate is certainly becoming an icon quicker than you can say “pajamas”—this policy may take some time to overrule, making Kate and William’s first son the heir to the throne and skipping over their daughter.


As a parent myself, I wonder how hard this would be for a parent to explain. “Honey, I’m sorry, but because you are a girl, your brother will be handling our country’s future—but I have an amazing Duke that I would like to introduce you to, and he has tons of ponies.”


Blech.


I don’t envy the position of Kate and William as far as the many hurdles they will face when they do become parents in the eye of public media.


Of course if they have a son first, this entire debate will be nothing to speak of.


Either way, it doesn’t look like immediate legislation will be taking place to change this procedure in Parliament, but it has Brits talking.


And it has me writing. 

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