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Blue Waffles

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Scientists, hormonally charged adolescents, and various immunologists have been fascinated by the issue of the blue waffle. How does it have such coloration? What causes it? How can waffles acquire such a hue?


But deep in the forests of Bavaria, we have known the basis of the cause, effect, and creation of the blue waffle. The secret to a tasty blue waffle is fresh air, plenty of sunshine, and warm, moist humus.


Yes, that secret is organic flowers, blueberries, blackberries, and their juices.


So today I share with you my grandmother’s very special recipe of blue waffles, though it is adapted from blue German crepes or pfannkuchen. Although Northern Germans speak funny, so they think a pfannkuchen is a doughnut.


No, it is a Bavarian crepe. Ignore them Northerners, we do.


So, this calls for a rather difficult-to-procure ingredient, dried Centaurea cyanus, or cornflower petals. Probably the most likely place to find it is in a health-food shop or an herbal tea bag. It is preferred as it is an interesting, complex, herbal-tasting edible flower.


I am very lucky, near where I live these are found in the wild. But I wash them thoroughly—who knows who peed (or worse) on them.


But, if you cannot find cornflower petals, never mind, blackberry juice shall suffice (or even organic blue food dye). No need to cry.


Included below is a sauce that can be used for everything. It is not super sweet like an American sauce from a bottle, but a little sour. You can adjust it to suit your palate.


Ingredients:
Several cornflower (Centaurea cyanus) petals, crushed with mortar and pestle
1/2 teaspoon baking soda (sodium bicarbonate [bicarb soda])
1 tablespoon blackberry jam
100 grams brown sugar
Two egg whites, well whipped
Two egg yolks, well whipped
75 grams light olive oil (or butter)
100 grams blueberries, rinsed and drained
100 grams blackberries, mashed
Two cups general-purpose flour
1 teaspoon olive oil if you do not have a waffle iron
1 cup of skim milk (you can use anything from butter milk, thick milk and cream, or even certain fromages, but I am providing a healthy recipe)


Ingredients Sauce de Blueberry:
1/2 cups fresh blueberries
1/2 cups fresh blackberries
3 tablespoons sugar (any is fine)
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon blackberry jam
1 tablespoon cornflower petals (crushed or not is up to you)


Equipment:
Large bowl for mixing.
Two large spoons or spatula (wooden is best). One for mixing, one kept clean and dry.
One fork
Sieve
Waffle iron or waffle grill (if not a skillet or fry pan will do)
Saucer
Grill (electric or gas is fine) and fry pan if you do not have a waffle iron.
Dinner plate with some paper towels on top.


Directions:
1. Separate your eggs using your saucer. Whip your egg whites then egg yolks and set to one side.
2. Sieve the flour into the bowl (so there are no lumps).
3. Mix the dry ingredients (baking soda, sugar, flour, and cornflower petals) thoroughly in a large bowl. Use whatever you have, spoon, fork, etc.
4. Separate the dry ingredients to make a cavity in the centre.
5. Add the wet ingredients (jam, egg whites, olive oil, blueberries, blackberries) and thoroughly mix together.
6. Now add your egg yolks. Do not fret about smashing your berries. Your molars will do it later anyway.
The point is to make a thoroughly dissipated mixture of uniform color and fruit disposition. Consistency should as runny as thick milk.
7. Use your mixing spoon to put into waffle iron. Takes about five to ten minutes to cook.


Or traditional Grandmother’s way:


8. Heat 1 teaspoon olive oil in a frying pan (Teflon coated is handy), medium gas flame or heat.
9. Tilt your pan in circular fashion (like a TV chef) so the oil is evenly distributed. You can make a test waffle using only a spoon of batter. If your batter is too thick, you can use skim milk to thin it.
10. Spoon quickly onto the pan four spoonfuls or so of mixture. Spread quickly out thinly with the clean spoon.
11. Cook until the waffle base is brown, and the top commences to bubble.
12. Now the tricky part. My grandmother was actually a chef so she could flip easily using the pan, but for clumsy people like me, I suggest carefully pushing the waffle to one side of the pan, and using a fork pressed against the spoon to grasp (sometimes fingers—ouch!) the waffle and flip it over very quickly. If you are not too slow your fingers will not be burnt. So, unless you want medium-rare finger tips, it’s perhaps wiser to use a fork or better, a pair of tongs (blunter is better, but use what you have).
13. Put them to one side. You can put them on a plate, but I prefer to put them onto paper towel. You can use a cake drier or grill so excess the oil drips off.
14. Keep making them one by one.


Makes about 6–8 waffles.


Sauce de Blueberry:
Directions:
1. Take your fry pan off the flame. Tip out excess olive oil. Allow to cool.
2. When warmish, place all ingredients at once into fry pan very quickly. Stir and pulverize your fruits vigorously with your spoon.
3. Put the fry pan back on the flame, high flame to get it to boil.
4. Immediately upon boiling, reduce the flame to very low.
5. Allow to simmer one or two minutes, no longer.
6. Pour into gravy boat or serving dish, or spoon over the warm waffles.


This is also a good recipe for blue crepes, pfannkuechen (German crepes), muffins, pooffertjes (Dutch small cakes), or you can add extra flour and eggs as required to even make a cake.


Enjoy your blue waffles. A true gourmet recipe.

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