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Mr. Jones and Me: Teacher Knows Best

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I wasn’t a very motivated student for most of my childhood. My classes were boring, and I did my schoolwork at home with anger in my eyes. When I got to high school, I was just as unmotivated as before. I signed up for classes that sounded the easiest, or at least most different from what I had taken before, in hopes that they would be interesting enough for me to keep my eyes open. One of those classes was an introduction to business. It was extremely basic; it mostly covered industry terms and the different avenues you could go down with a business degree, as well as business management, finance, and sales. But when we got to the marketing section of the class, my interest was piqued—that was the year I discovered my passion for business marketing, and I have Mr. Jones to thank for it.


Mr. Jones was a businessman himself, who later became a teacher so he could spread his hands-on knowledge of the business world. Although he stuck to the book, he spiced up each lesson by relating it to his own experiences. He had a story for everything! I remember thinking I wanted to have as much passion and business acumen as he did, so I was constantly picking his brain for any suggestions he had for my future. When class sign-ups came around for the next semester, I enrolled in another one of his classes. I continued to do this every semester in high school, and I loved every class he taught. When the time came to pick classes for my senior year of high school, I searched the itinerary for any classes Mr. Jones was teaching, but I had taken them all. Even though I wasn’t able to be his student anymore, I visited him regularly, just to hear more of his stories, including once or twice after I graduated high school. I think Mr. Jones would be proud to hear that he’s a big reason why I went to college and graduated with a degree in business marketing.


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